Weekly Game Review: “12 chairs”

Year: 2002
Genre: Quest, Adventure
Discs: 2 CD(*.iso)
Developer: Saturn+
Entertainer: Buka
Requirements: Windows 98/Me/2000/XP, Celeron 300, ram 32 mb, Cd-Rom 4-x, DirectX 8.0
Hints: The bottom line: “12 chairs” – another game, produced jointly by “Buck” and “Saturn +” continues a series of animated quests. The passage contains spoilers to some parts of the game, so if you arent familiar with the game or dont want to know what to expect, recommended. A Mindscape executive agreed, saying that "Unfortunately, its effect has been extremely negative. These publications provided game code that could be typed into a computer and played, encouraging readers to submit their own software to competitions.[5] Microchess was one of the first games for microcomputers which was sold to the public. Also in 1989, the FM Towns computer included built-in PCM sound, in addition to a CD-ROM drive and 24-bit color graphics. The success of 3D console titles such as Super Mario 64 increased interest in hardware accelerated 3D graphics on PCs, and soon resulted in attempts to produce affordable solutions with the ATI Rage, Matrox Mystique, and S3 ViRGE. More than a third of games sold in North America were for the PC, twice as many as those for the Apple II and even outselling those for the Commodore 64. Without question, Nintendo's success has eroded software sales. The faster graphics accelerators and improving CPU technology resulted in increasing levels of realism in computer games. By 1990 DOS comprised 65% of the computer-game market, with the Amiga at 10%; all other computers, including the Apple Macintosh, were below 10% and declining. However, the rise of the Creative Labs Sound Blaster card, released in 1989, which featured much higher sound quality due to the inclusion of a PCM channel and digital signal processor, led AdLib to file for bankruptcy by 1992. OXO, an adaptation of tic-tac-toe for the EDSAC, debuted in 1952.

Walkthrough:

This is a detective game in which you have a helper named Smart Alex. Using Smart Alex you can explore and analyze the items that were in your inventory, interact with different objects, turn on/off the flashlight, move to another location, get hints, and, in addition, to skip the puzzle. The game has a scoring system that determines what rank you get at the end of the game. The more points you earn, the higher the rating. Points are awarded for various actions, for example, collecting comic books, solving puzzles, etc. NOTE: At the simplest level of complexity you lose points for skipping puzzles and the use of Smart tips Alex. Also, you lose points for dying, regardless of difficulty level. Vorobyaninov decides to look for the treasure alone, but by chance he meets on his way tipster Ostap Bender. The 1993 release of Doom on the PC was a breakthrough in 3D graphics, and was soon ported to various game consoles in a general shift toward greater realism. Further improvements to game artwork and audio were made possible with the introduction of FM synthesis sound. An early text-adventure, Adventure, was developed for the PDP-11 minicomputer by Will Crowther in 1976, and expanded by Don Woods in 1977.[4] By the 1980s, personal computers had become powerful enough to run games like Adventure, but by this time, graphics were beginning to become an important factor in games. (The game Les Manley 2 satirized this by depicting two beautiful women exhaust the hero in bed, by requesting that he again explain the difference between extended and expanded memory.) Computer Gaming World provided technical assistance to its writers to help install games for review.[32] By 1996, the growing popularity of Microsoft Windows simplified device driver and memory management. Players found modifying CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files for memory management cumbersome and confusing, and each game needed a different configuration. Home computer games became popular following the video game crash of 1983, particularly in Europe, leading to the era of the "bedroom coder". Home computer games became popular following the video game crash of 1983, particularly in Europe, leading to the era of the "bedroom coder". By the end of 1989, however, most publishers moved to at supporting at least 320x200 MCGA, a subset of VGA.[21] VGA gave the PC graphics that outmatched the Commodore Amiga. Consumers began purchasing DOS computers for the home in large numbers. By the late 1970s to early 1980s, games were developed and distributed through hobbyist groups and gaming magazines, such as Creative Computing and later Computer Gaming World.